**** LATEST NEWS! ****

 

Press Release

As new global mercury treaty enters into force, worldwide mercury production skyrockets, 
notes Global NGO Coalition on World Environmental Health Day

Geneva, 26 September 2017- As 156 countries convened for the first meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Minamata Convention, 
a new UN report shows mercury mining skyrocketing in the last 5 years. Moreover, much of that mercury is used in artisanal and 
small scale gold mining (ASGM), the largest source of global mercury pollution.

Currently, countries do not have reliable information about trade in neighboring countries and within their own region. 
This problem is compounded where borders between countries are “porous,” and a significant portion of trade is informal or illegal. 
For example, mercury may enter a region through legal trade to one country, but then be traded illegally across borders to neighboring countries. 

“Informal trade is difficult to track, and therefore does not appear in the official trade statistics,” said Elena Lymberidi-Settimo, 
Project Manager, Zero Mercury Campaign at the European Environmental Bureau. 
“With timely reporting, Parties can better understand mercury flows in order to better enforce trade restrictions in the Convention.”

“In recent years there have been a number of shocks to the global market, resulting in a doubling of the price of mercury in the last 12 months alone,” 
said Michael Bender, Co-coordinator of the Zero Mercury Working Group. “In addition, EU and US export bans now in place have resulted 
in a major shift in the main trading hub to Asia.”

“The emergence over the past five years of new small-scale producers of mercury in Mexico and Indonesia has made a difficult situation worse,” 
said Satish Sinha, Associate Director at Toxics Link in India. “Between these two countries alone, around 1000 tonnes are produced annually.”

“The main objective of the Minamata Convention is to protect human health and the environment by, in part, simultaneously 
reducing mercury supply and demand,” said  Rico Euripidou, Environmental Health Campaign Manager at groundWork 
in South Africa. Without adequate reporting on the global movement of mercury it will 
be difficult to monitor the overall effectiveness of the Convention, say NGOs.

“Annual reporting is consistent with the requirements of other environmental conventions such as Basel and the Montreal Protocol,” 
said Leslie Adogame, Executive Director at Sustainable Research and Action for Environmental Development in Nigeria.
“Legal trade flows must be understood before informal or illegal trade can be adequately addressed.”

An analysis of publicly available UN COMTRADE data over the period 2013-2016 (see below) reveals that the majority of global mercury flows 
from commodity trading centres (such as Hong Kong, Singapore and the UAE) to developing country regions (such as Africa and Latin America) 
where mercury use in ASGM is prolific in response to the largest global gold rush the world has ever seen. 

see table at the pdf

see also PR in FR 

Notes to the editor

http://www.mercuryconvention.org/

 https://wedocs.unep.org/bitstream/handle/20.500.11822/21725/global_mercury.pdf?sequence=1&;;isAllowed=y

http://www.ifeh.org/wehd/

www.zeromercury.org

For further information, please contact:                                         

Elena Lymberidi-Settimo, Project Coordinator ‘Zero Mercury Campaign’, European Environmental Bureau, ZMWG International Coordinator
T: +32 2 2891301,   This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " target="_blank"> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " data-mce-href="mailto: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ">  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " target="_blank"> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " data-mce-href="mailto: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Michael Bender, ZMWG International Coordinator, T: +1 802 917 8222,    This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " target="_blank"> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " data-mce-href="mailto: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ">  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " target="_blank"> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " data-mce-href="mailto: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

David Lennett, Natural Resources Defense Council, T:  +1 202 460 8517    This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " target="_blank"> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " data-mce-href="mailto: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " target="_blank"> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " data-mce-href="mailto: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

*The Zero Mercury Working Group (ZMWG) is an international coalition of over 95 public interest environmental and health non-governmental organizations from more than 50 countries from around the world formed in 2005 by the European Environmental Bureau and the Mercury Policy Project.  ZMWG strives for zero supply, demand, and emissions of mercury from all anthropogenic sources, with the goal of reducing mercury in the global environment to a minimum.  Our mission is to advocate and support the adoption and implementation of a legally binding instrument which contains mandatory obligations to eliminate where feasible, and otherwise minimize, the global supply and trade of mercury, the global demand for mercury, anthropogenic releases of mercury to the environment, and human and wildlife exposure to mercury.

Home Press Releases A pesar de los progresos, el acuerdo mundial sobre el mercurio está amenazado por la producción y...
A pesar de los progresos, el acuerdo mundial sobre el mercurio está amenazado por la producción y el comercio incontrolado. PDF Print
Wednesday, 09 March 2016 13:33

Nota de Prensa

A pesar de los progresos, el acuerdo mundial sobre el  mercurio está amenazado por la producción y el comercio incontrolado.

Grupos piden a los gobiernos una rápida ratificación y pronta aplicación del Tratado de Minamata

Amman, Jordania, 9 de marzo de 2016-Los compromisos para un fuerte control sobre el  mercurio a nivel mundial se están viendo obstaculizados por la producción y el comercio  ilegal  de mercurio, no declarados  ni regulados, una coalición internacional de ONG reveló hoy en la víspera de la reunión sobre el tratado de las Naciones Unidas sobre el mercurio en Jordania.

El Grupo de Trabajo Mercurio Cero [1] (ZMWG) dijo que los esfuerzos mundiales para reducir las emisiones de mercurio pueden fracasar si lagunas en los controles sobre la producción y el comercio de mercurio no se tratan antes de que el tratado entre en vigor.

“El tráfico con mercurio no es como la venta de patatas fritas,” declaró Michael Bender, Coordinador Internacional de ZMWG. “Hay consecuencias de sobra conocidas cuando su  producción, comercio y posterior liberación en la biosfera se hace de forma descontrolada.”

El mercurio es una potente  y persistente neurotoxina que se bioacumula, que presenta mayores riesgos para los niños en desarrollo, las poblaciones costeras y para millones de mineros del oro a pequeña escala que utilizan mercurio en todo el mundo.

El Convenio de Minamata sobre el Mercurio, acordado en 2013, firmado por 128 países y ratificado por 23 países hasta el momento, es un tratado que proteja la salud  humana y el medio ambiente frente a la contaminación por mercurio. El tratado prohíbe  nuevas minas de mercurio, fija medidas de control de emisiones a la atmósfera, impone   normas sobre la minería artesanal y a pequeña escala del oro, e impone la  eliminación progresiva de la minería y de los productos existentes.

La reunión en Jordania esta semana es el séptimo período de sesiones del Comité Intergubernamental de Negociación (CIN) sobre el mercurio. Los delegados se reúnen para ponerse de acuerdo sobre los detalles del acuerdo. Esta es la última reunión  antes de que el Convenio entre en vigor, una vez que 50 países lo ratifiquen.

“Los países tienen que permanecer fieles al espíritu y la intención de este acuerdo histórico”, declaró Elena Lymberidi-Settimo, Coordinadora Internacional de ZMWG. “Para poner fin al flujo necesitamos saber primero de donde viene el suministro de mercurio,  y a donde va.”

Importantes deficiencias en la información sobre la producción de mercurio y los flujos comerciales impiden una comprensión clara de la situación mundial de la oferta. Actualmente no existe información estándar o relación sobre la producción de mercurio, la oferta y su comercio. Algunos países productores de mercurio no informan sobre los niveles de producción y muchos países no tienen ninguna lista exacta de sus existencias de mercurio debido a la proliferación de suministros ilegales o de contrabando.

“Es preocupante que nuevas y que pronto serán  ilegales minas de mercurio primario están ahora apareciendo en Indonesia y México, y que el Este de Asia se está convirtiendo en un importante centro de comercio de mercurio,”  declaró Richard Gutiérrez, director de Ban Tóxicos! - Filipinas.” Todo esto nutre la demanda de mercurio a la minería de oro a pequeña escala en Asia, América Latina y potencialmente en todo el mundo. Estas tendencias no son un buen presagio para el futuro del tratado”.

El ZMWG cree que para controlar y gestionar eficazmente el comercio del mercurio, los países deben comenzar a identificar y cuantificar sus fuentes de producción de mercurio. Los gobiernos deben ser transparentes sobre sus volúmenes de producción y reservas, y sobre quién está exportando, cuánto y a qué países.

“La prevención de la producción de mercurio oportunista y el comercio mediante una estructura de información y seguimiento eficiente ayudará a evitar que continúe. Esto debería ser una prioridad cuando los gobiernos se reúnen mañana”, dijo Rico Euripidou de GroundWork Sudáfrica. “La presentación de datos debe ser una parte integrante del tratado. De lo contrario el tratado puede llegar a no ser más que papel mojado”.

Para obtener más información, póngase en contacto:

Elena Lymberidi-Settimo, Coordinadora Internacional ZMWG, Móvil: +32 496 532818, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Michael Bender, Coordinador Internacional ZMWG, M: +1 802 9174579, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Richard Gutiérrez, Director, Ban Tóxicos !, Filipinas, M: +63 2 355 7640, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Rico Euripidou, GroundWork - Amigos de la Tierra Sudáfrica, M: +27 835193008, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Notas para los editores:

[1] ZMWG es una coalición internacional de más de 95 organizaciones no gubernamentales de interés público defensoras del medio ambiente y de la salud de más de 50 países.

[2] El Convenio de Minamata sobre el Mercurio http://www.mercuryconvention.org