**** LATEST NEWS! ****

 

Press Release

As new global mercury treaty enters into force, worldwide mercury production skyrockets, 
notes Global NGO Coalition on World Environmental Health Day

Geneva, 26 September 2017- As 156 countries convened for the first meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Minamata Convention, 
a new UN report shows mercury mining skyrocketing in the last 5 years. Moreover, much of that mercury is used in artisanal and 
small scale gold mining (ASGM), the largest source of global mercury pollution.

Currently, countries do not have reliable information about trade in neighboring countries and within their own region. 
This problem is compounded where borders between countries are “porous,” and a significant portion of trade is informal or illegal. 
For example, mercury may enter a region through legal trade to one country, but then be traded illegally across borders to neighboring countries. 

“Informal trade is difficult to track, and therefore does not appear in the official trade statistics,” said Elena Lymberidi-Settimo, 
Project Manager, Zero Mercury Campaign at the European Environmental Bureau. 
“With timely reporting, Parties can better understand mercury flows in order to better enforce trade restrictions in the Convention.”

“In recent years there have been a number of shocks to the global market, resulting in a doubling of the price of mercury in the last 12 months alone,” 
said Michael Bender, Co-coordinator of the Zero Mercury Working Group. “In addition, EU and US export bans now in place have resulted 
in a major shift in the main trading hub to Asia.”

“The emergence over the past five years of new small-scale producers of mercury in Mexico and Indonesia has made a difficult situation worse,” 
said Satish Sinha, Associate Director at Toxics Link in India. “Between these two countries alone, around 1000 tonnes are produced annually.”

“The main objective of the Minamata Convention is to protect human health and the environment by, in part, simultaneously 
reducing mercury supply and demand,” said  Rico Euripidou, Environmental Health Campaign Manager at groundWork 
in South Africa. Without adequate reporting on the global movement of mercury it will 
be difficult to monitor the overall effectiveness of the Convention, say NGOs.

“Annual reporting is consistent with the requirements of other environmental conventions such as Basel and the Montreal Protocol,” 
said Leslie Adogame, Executive Director at Sustainable Research and Action for Environmental Development in Nigeria.
“Legal trade flows must be understood before informal or illegal trade can be adequately addressed.”

An analysis of publicly available UN COMTRADE data over the period 2013-2016 (see below) reveals that the majority of global mercury flows 
from commodity trading centres (such as Hong Kong, Singapore and the UAE) to developing country regions (such as Africa and Latin America) 
where mercury use in ASGM is prolific in response to the largest global gold rush the world has ever seen. 

see table at the pdf

see also PR in FR 

Notes to the editor

http://www.mercuryconvention.org/

 https://wedocs.unep.org/bitstream/handle/20.500.11822/21725/global_mercury.pdf?sequence=1&;;isAllowed=y

http://www.ifeh.org/wehd/

www.zeromercury.org

For further information, please contact:                                         

Elena Lymberidi-Settimo, Project Coordinator ‘Zero Mercury Campaign’, European Environmental Bureau, ZMWG International Coordinator
T: +32 2 2891301,   This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " target="_blank"> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " data-mce-href="mailto: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ">  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " target="_blank"> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " data-mce-href="mailto: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Michael Bender, ZMWG International Coordinator, T: +1 802 917 8222,    This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " target="_blank"> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " data-mce-href="mailto: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ">  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " target="_blank"> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " data-mce-href="mailto: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

David Lennett, Natural Resources Defense Council, T:  +1 202 460 8517    This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " target="_blank"> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " data-mce-href="mailto: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " target="_blank"> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it " data-mce-href="mailto: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it "> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

*The Zero Mercury Working Group (ZMWG) is an international coalition of over 95 public interest environmental and health non-governmental organizations from more than 50 countries from around the world formed in 2005 by the European Environmental Bureau and the Mercury Policy Project.  ZMWG strives for zero supply, demand, and emissions of mercury from all anthropogenic sources, with the goal of reducing mercury in the global environment to a minimum.  Our mission is to advocate and support the adoption and implementation of a legally binding instrument which contains mandatory obligations to eliminate where feasible, and otherwise minimize, the global supply and trade of mercury, the global demand for mercury, anthropogenic releases of mercury to the environment, and human and wildlife exposure to mercury.

Dental amalgam PDF Print
Friday, 30 July 2010 17:02

Dental amalgam contains approximately 50% elemental mercury, 30% silver and 20% other metals such as copper, tin and zinc.

In 2005 approximately 240-300 tonnes of mercury were used as an ingredient in dental amalgam by dentists worldwide.

Some countries are taking a precautionary approach to protect the environment from the harmful effects of mercury and taking measures to reduce the use of mercury in dentistry.

 

Alternatives to mercury dental amalgam exist, such as composites (most common), glass ionomers and copolymers (modified composites). These are all effective alternatives that are generally considered more attractive than traditional amalgam.

 

Most dental practitioners continue to charge less for mercury amalgams than for the alternatives. The speed with which dental amalgams are being replaced varies widely, and mercury use is still significant in most countries.

 

Relevant legislation and advisories and NGO policy work

In the EU

Mercury in dental amalgam was relevant to two actions included in the 2005 EU Mercury Strategy. NGOs followed all relevant developments from 2005 - 2008. 

In 2011 the EU launched a study to carry out a full life-cycle assessment of the mercury us in dentistry- mainly looking at the environmental effects caused. The study is expected to be completed by spring 2012.

Relevant work and follow up by the NGOs can be found here.

The European Parliament resolution on the European Environment & Health Action Plan 2004-2010 - Article 6, declared that, consistent with the “opinion of the relevant Scientific Committee, urgent consideration should be given to restricting the marketing and/or the use of mercury used in dental amalgams

Further to above, a number of countries have put in place measures to reduce or even phase out the use of mercury in the dental sector. In addition to the use of amalgam separators to substantially reduce the amount of mercury discharges through wastewater from dental clinics (combined with appropriate service to maintain the effectiveness of these systems), some countries are also promoting the substitution of mercury-containing amalgam fillings, especially among sensitive populations including pregnant women, children and those with impaired kidney functions.

Denmark and Sweden maybe the only countries that have gone farthest in eliminating the use of mercury-containing amalgam. The Swedish Government’s overall goal to phase out mercury also includes dental amalgam. In Sweden, where dental amalgam has been subject primarily to voluntary phasing out measures, the consumption of mercury for dental use has decreased significantly after a policy decision by the Parliament in 1994 to phase out the use of dental amalgam.

In Denmark, dental amalgam is allowed only in molar teeth where the filling is subject to wear, but the Government is ready to ban the remaining use of dental amalgam as soon as the Danish National Board of Health is satisfied that the non-mercury alternatives are adequate for all requirements.

Norway has also developed a directive (from 1 January 2003) on the use of dental filling materials, which encourages dentists to reduce the use of amalgam as much as possible.

 

Globally

Work is currently being undertaken under the UNEP Mercury partnership area on Mercury in Products.

In the US

In 2006, EPA was developing a dental office amalgam recycling program called its “gray bag” program. This program would assist dentists in properly collecting and managing dental amalgam wastes generated in their offices to minimize mercury releases to air, land, and water. This program also will ensure that dental amalgam is sent to responsible recyclers who would ensure that it does not end up in wastewater streams as well as in municipal and medical waste incinerators.

In the US see also relevant laws and regulations at http://www.epa.gov/hg/regs.htm and at http://www.newmoa.org/prevention/mercury/modelleg.cfm

In New Zealand, a “Practice guideline - controlling dental amalgam waste and wastewater discharges” has been adopted. It recommended that amalgam waste should be collected, stored and sent for recycling, or for disposal at an approved landfill when collection for recycling is not available. Also, amalgam scrap and contaminated particulate amalgam waste should not be disposed of in any medical waste to be incinerated. Dental surgeries should use systems to reduce amalgam discharge to wastewater, including amalgam separators where local authorities require. It has issued precautionary advice for dentists and pregnant women. It recommended that amalgam should be used with informed consent of patients (UNEP, 2002).